Shows and Events


Crowning Glory Series: Ancient History from Diadem to Tiara and Crown

This coming March Danaca Design will be hosting a show featuring tiaras and crowns in many forms called Crowning Glory: Ruling Our Own Destinies, Directing Our Own Paths. While the artists will be exploring the diverse cultural, artistic, historic, and social narratives of these accessories April decided to look into the history of these royal accessories to use as a post on the Danaca Design blog. It turned out to be a fascinating subject so instead of making one post she turned it into a four part series being posted every Monday in February leading up to our show opening and reception on Friday, March 2, 6-8:30pm. This week part 1 is focused on the ancient history of tiaras and crowns.

Pictured is a “radiant crown” on a coin from the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt around 250 b.c.e

 

Tiaras, crowns, these head ornaments have been used for centuries to symbolize social superiority and power, have a history going back to ancient Egypt and Greece. Originally these head pieces were called a “diadem” derived from the Ancient Greek “dia dein” meaning “to bind around”.  The ancient Egyptian pharaohs would wear gold head-bands that could be decorated with tassels and other ornaments that hung over the forehead, temple, or even down to the shoulders.

 

photo credit:Antikenmuseum Basel und Sammlung Ludwig(http://www.antikenmuseumbasel.ch/) / Egyptian Museum, Cairo via www.nationalgeographic.com

Diadem found in the tomb of King Tutankhamun

An excellent example of this is the diadem discovered in the tomb of Tutankhamun, King of Egypt in ca. 1339-1329 b.c.e. (pictured above) Discovered during the excavation of his tomb in 1922 the kings mummy was adorned with a gold diadem formed in a circlet, at the front a detachable gold ornament with the head of a vulture and the body of a cobra, symbolizing the unification of Lower and Upper Egypt. It is also inlaid with glass, obsidian, carnelian, malachite, chalcedony, and lapis lazuli.

Gold diadem of Pantikapeion 300 BC Panticapaeum Important Greek city on eastern shore of Taurica

 

In Ancient Greece diadems were made from all kinds of metal, and with a limited amount of gold available, Greek metalsmiths would decorate them with embossed rosettes, filigree, and other motifs such as the Heracles knot which was found frequently in Hellenistic jewelry. Once Alexander the Great opened up the gold supply from the Persian Empire in 331 B.C.E. the styles became even more elaborate and often contained intricate garlands of tassles, leaves, and flowers.

Achaemenid Seal made of jasper and hematite. You can just see that little pointy crown on top of the king’s head.

The shift from diadems as just a circular band to what we now consider tiaras and crowns today is attributed to Ancient Persia, now Iran. The original term “tiara” is Persian in origin and in its original form describes the high peaked head decoration worn by Persian kings. However in ancient Persia crowns were worn in many forms and ancient authors did not always distinguish clearly among the various terms for them, making the most reliable evidence for forms of Persian crowns/tiaras are the depictions on objects such as monuments and coins.

Kings from the Achaemenid period wore tall and serrated golden crowns, called a crenelated crown, which was adorned with gold leaves and colorful jewels. The 22 or 24 serrations of the crown symbolized towers, battlements, temples, or the Sun. The Achaemenid queen wore a jeweled crown with a thin piece of cloth reaching her knees attached. Based on historical documents it seems that the only difference between the King and Queen’s head wear was the thin cloth.

Coin with Tigranes the Great portrait (Armenian king, ruled 95 BCE–55 BCE). Coin – Ar, 29mm, 16,41g.

However it was not just the royal Persians that wore head covers to denote status in society. From writings by the ancient Greeks it appears that a tiara was a soft headdress often with a high point and members of the Median upper class wore these high, crested tiaras. Median civilians and officers covered their heads with round and soft egg-shaped felt caps which were decorated with lace. Ancient reliefs depict archers with these caps and a crenelated diadem worn over them. Upper class Achaemenid women wore long headscarves some reaching down to their ankles. This shawl-like headdress was not wrapped under the neck but was usually worn with a diadem on top very similar to many popular bridal veil styles worn today.

Well that wraps up part 1 of this 4 part series. Honestly it is really hard to figure out when to stop because their is just so much fascinating history but if you want to check out more really cool pictures of ancient diadem, crowns, and more I suggest going to The Metropolitan Museum’s website at www.metmuseum.org where you can browse their entire collection online.

Check back next Monday to find out about the crowns and tiaras of south and east Asia…I can’t wait.

 

 

Photo credits:

King Tut diadem:  Antikenmuseum Basel und Sammlung Ludwig(http://www.antikenmuseumbasel.ch/) / Egyptian Museum, Cairo via www.nationalgeographic.com

Greek diadem: Staatliche Antikensammlungen, Munich via http://metmuseum.org  Metropolitan Museum of Art

Achaemenid Seal: The Met, https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/323560?sortBy=Relevance&ft=achaemenid&offset=20&rpp=20&pos=29

Coin with Tigranes: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tigran_Mets.jpg; Author unknown

House Rules! 2017

The House Rules! show 2017 – May 1-June30 

Opening Reception May 5, 5:30-9:30pm

5619 University Way NE, Seattle WA

Friday, May 5, is the reception for, The House Rules! our group art jewelry show, just in time for Mother’s Day.

 

Traditionally, this event has been a fundraiser for our scholarship however this year we’ve decided to raise funds for the American Civil Liberties Union. The theme for our special fundraising exhibition is, MAY DAY!

 

50-100% of sales from these special exhibition pieces will be donated to the ACLU. Friday night, May 5, a minimum of 25% of ALL SALES IN THE GALLERY will be donated to the ACLU. On Friday night we will also raffle a class of your choosing with 100% of raffle ticket sales going directly to the ACLU.

Raffle tickets are on sale now for $10 each or 3 for $25. These can be purchased in our studio. Cash or check only, please make checks out to ACLU.

Please join us to share in our warm-hearted community and raise funds to protect our hard earned American rights, no matter what your politics.

Refreshments served with meze provided by Cafe Paloma.

Raffle drawn 8:30 (although you do not have to be present to win!)

Annual Swap Meet Coming Soon

Start clearing out those studio closets and get your spring cleaning going because the annual Jewelry Tools & Supply Swap Meet is coming soon!

We still have a few vendor spaces open if you’d like to unload all of those items that we all seem to collect in our studios but just aren’t using or don’t need. In the past people have swapped everything from stones and beads to enameling equipment so you never know what you’ll find.

Nothing you want to get rid or still building your studio? This is a great way to find tools for really low prices. Last year I picked up two hammers and a plier stand for $8…sweet deal. Plus we always have a Free table…I wonder what hidden treasures will be on it this year?

Don’t forget to mark your calendar for Sunday, April 2 from 9am-12pm. If you’d like to reserve a vendor spot give us a call at 206-542-0916 or email us at dana@danacadesign.com

Danaca Design is located at 5619 University Way NE, Seattle WA. You can find plenty of free street parking on our block and the surrounding neighborhood. We hope to see you 🙂

Trunk Show with Iris Guy and Melissa Cameron

flyer-november

 

Thursday, Nov 17th from 5:30-8:00pm Danaca Design is hosting Iris Guy and Melissa Cameron’s trunk show. We’ve been fans of both of these amazing women’s work for some time and very excited to see their new jewelry.

Not familiar with Iris or Melissa? Read on for more info:

Melissa Cameron

Melissa Cameron

Melissa Cameron

Australian-born artist and writer Melissa Cameron lives and works in Seattle, WA in the USA. She received her MFA in jewellery and metalsmithing from Monash University and a BA (hons) in interior architecture from Curtin University, in Australia. Her works are in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, the Cheongju City Collection in South Korea, the Arts Centre Melbourne and Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery.

 

 

Deep Slip by Melissa Cameron

“Deep Slip” by Melissa Cameron

 

“I am a research jeweler.

The evidence of my investigations – the jewelry I produce – speaks to my interest in architecture, geometry, social justice, and the human body. Through my work I attempt to manifest my belief in the interdependence of all matter, and the sacredness of human life…”

dmc_b-p_resistearrings02

“Resist” earrings by Melissa Cameron

“This show will see the debut of a new series of enamel and steel works, entitled Resist. An extension of my Body/Politic works, these pieces are individually enameled in a beautiful rainbow of blues, the color that is the opposite of orange on the traditional color wheel. 10% of the purchase price from the Resist line sold anywhere in the world will go to Islamic Relief USA, a non-profit 501(c)(3) humanitarian agency who work on international and domestic US development and relief projects.”

Brooch by Melissa Cameron

Brooch by Melissa Cameron

 

Iris Guy

Iris Guy

 

Iris Guy began studying conceptual design at an early age. Her avid interest in the field led to her formal study at the world renowned Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem, Israel. After graduating, she embarked on an award-winning career in graphic design. She relocated from Israel to Japan and finally to the United States, working as a freelance graphic artist.All the while, Iris designed jewelry for her friends and family.As the popularity of her personal collection grew, Iris decided to create a line of jewelry for the retail market

Hanging Line necklace by Iris Guy

Hanging Line necklace by Iris Guy

Simple, contemporary and lightweight, the Iris Guy jewelry collection offers something unique for everyone. Each individual piece is hand made in her Seattle based studio. Cultivated from unspoken desires and organic forms; playful shapes with architectural elements come to life in silver and 18k gold.

Flower brooch with rivets by Iris Guy

Flower brooch with rivets by Iris Guy

Her pieces say to their wearers – “Respond to your inner truth and desires”

 “My unique collection of necklaces and earrings features intrinsic organic elements – combining both masculine structure and the beauty of feminine contours. Simple, contemporary and lightweight! “

Galaxy earrings long comet by Iris Guy

Galaxy earrings long comet by Iris Guy