Tag Archives: Jenifer Stenhouse


Making Jewelry with Wire

Jewelry Making Basics with Wire

Instructor: Jennifer Stenhouse
November 4-5, Saturday and Sunday, 10:30 – 5:00
Class Fee: $295| Basic materials included

Basic Bead and Wire Jewelry

Instructor Dana Cassara
December 15, Friday, 10:00 – 1:00
Class Fee:$75| Basic materials included

If you’ve looked at our fall class schedule (and if you haven’t you can at www.danacadesign.com) you may have noticed that we are offering two classes about making wire jewelry: Jewelry Making Basics with Wire and Basic Bead and Wire Jewelry. Both of these classes will get you on your way making your own jewelry designs but what’s the difference between them?

Basic Bead and Wire Jewelry is teaching the skills most people think off when you say “wire jewelry”. Basic wire wrapping to create linkage systems for earrings, necklaces, ear wires, and clasps. These linkage systems can be used to add beads and other items to necklaces and earrings or to even be links all by themselves. Ear wires and clasps mean you don’t have to buy them premade and can make them to fit the style and design that meets your creative needs. All of these techniques are cold connected meaning that no soldering is involved so all you need to get started are a few pliers, wire cutters, hammer, and bench block.

From the links to the toggle clasp all you need is some wire and solder know how!

 

The Jewelry Making Basics with Wire workshop is taking wire jewelry to the next level. In this class you will learn the essentials of soldering wire and making wire jewelry. So you can make your own chain and a variety of clasps and findings. But that’s not all you can do. Basic prong setting and some quick tricks for simple stacking rings are also covered in this class.  

 

Examples of prongs settings made with wire

 

Hopefully we’ve inspired you to start looking at wire in new ways. Now the real question is what are you going to make with wire?

 

To register for these or any of our other classes call us at 206-524-0916 or stop by our studio at 5619 University Way NE, Seattle

For  our complete fall schedule visit us at www.danacadesign.com

 

Meet and Greet with Jennifer Stenhouse

jennifer_stenhouse

A native of Atlanta Georgia, Jennifer Stenhouse currently makes her home and studio in Seattle, Washington. She has been teaching art and jewelry classes, workshops, lectured and exhibited throughout U.S. and Mexico for over 20 years. 

At the University of Wisconsin Madison, Jennifer studied with Martha Glowacki who encouraged her use of mixed media and jewelry skills. Fred Fenster and Eleanor Moty gave Jennifer the opprotunity to develop a strong base in metals techniques and design, and a better understanding of integrity  to one’s craft. 

Jennifer began teaching at Savannah College of Art and Design in Foundations and Jewelry classes as elective. Due to the strong interest from students wanting to major in Metals and Jewelry, Jennifer proposed and the developed The Metals and Jewelry Department. While in Savannah she also maintaned a small studio in the historic City Market. After departing Savannah Jennifer began teaching at the Vermont Art Exchange in North Bennington, Vermont. At VAE she taught several classes and workshops in jewelry, printmaking and drawing.

Currently Jennifer teaches jewelry classes and workshops in the Seattle, Washington area, including Pratt Fine Art Center, Danaca Design, and Tacoma Metal Arts Center. 

jennifer bee
  1. How long have you been making Jewelry?

I actually started making stuff as early as I can remember. My grandfather taught me photography. I was continuing with photography and printmaking in college. I began to use found objects, collage and mixed media elements in the work until they ultimately became 3-d objects. The sculpture scale I was working in was very small. The jewelry studio seemed to make the most sense for the tools and techniques I needed. So I came to develop my skills in the jewelry studio. By 1992, I began teaching at Savannah College of Art & Design. By the following year we developed the new metal department at SCAD.

great-white-mesh_144_big

  1. You teach as well, how did you get into teaching?

I love teaching art. I’ve been teaching since 1990 in foundation classes, art criticism, jewelry, and metals techniques. One of the reasons I decided to go to University of Wisconsin-Madison, was because every other school I was looking at for graduate school, had at least one professor from Madison. I wanted a good start as a teacher in a place that produced good teachers.

  1. Is there anything in particular that you like about jewelry as a medium?

Well of course! I actually started casting before I learned anything else in the jewelry studio, and I’m still amazed at the endless possibilities. I believe one could study metals and jewelry for a thousand years and not truly master everything. 

  1. We have a variety of your cuttlebone pieces in the gallery, is there anything you’d like to share with us about why you enjoy working with cuttlebone, how you came around to using it, or anything interesting about the material and it’s possibilities?

Ah the awesome little cuttlefish!!! How I love it so! Each one is unique and marvelous. The texture is an amazingly intricate delicate pattern interrupted by carving and captured by metal. The history of the use of cuttlebone as a mold is inspiring. But, the way I like to use it for pattern and immediacy is what makes me most happy!
dscn2128_164_bigimage_198_big

  1. What are your favorite materials to work with, and why? 

I like casting with silver and bronze, and playing with stones. But I have to admit copper is what I love the most. Because I started in printmaking, copper is the gold standard in the etching and engraving world. So when I first ventured into a jewelry studio and caught a glimpse of their stomp shear scrap bin full of copper….I was confused! What were they doing with it? Hollow forms, color, heat, shape, texture! It was colorful, textural, sensual! Amazing stuff! 
dscn2135_148_big

  1. I find that jewelers tend to have one part of the process they love best, for some it’s sawing, for others it’s soldering. Do you have a favorite part of the jewelry process?

I’m really seduced by the feel of the materials I’m working with. The textures of the materials and tools. They feel good. I’m always feeling each part, material, stone, saw blade, edges….that is what makes me keep going. But I love the processes of casting. It’s the ritual, the smell, the heat. 

jensten

  1. What kind of imagery or inspiration do you use? Or, can you tell us about any recurring themes in your work?

Much of my sculpture is based in universal mythologies and synchronicity. I like to try and work with materials that help to relate a narrative, or open a conversation with the viewer. With my jewelry I try to find a way to streamline those ideas and materials into a much more simple thought, comment, or expression. 

  1. Do you have a website related to your work?

www.jenniferstenhouse.com

 

Don’t forget to check out Jenifer’s upcoming class at Danaca Design…

 

Survey of Stone Setting

January 21, 28, and February 4, 11, 18, 25, 6 Wednesday nights, 6:30 – 9:30

Class Photos

This fast-paced, primarily demonstration style course will introduce students to a wide variety of stone setting techniques including a basic bezel for cabochons; prong and flush settings for faceted stones; pedestal settings; tube, post, and bar settings for multiple stones; capture sets; and a few ideas for how to set unusual shaped stones or found objects. Soldering setups and finishing tips, as well as overview of tools and equipment that make setting easier and provide professional finishes will be introduced in this comprehensive and valuable class. For those with experience it may provide some review and/or a critical missing link of information. For beginning students this course will offer an excellent overview of what is possible with stones and simple techniques to jump in and try. All levels, basic metal working helpful.

Instructor: Jennifer Stenhouse